We are our stories. Shaping our past experiences into a story helps us make sense of the world and our place in it. Stories communicate our most cherished values and dearly-held beliefs. They bring history to life by animating what might otherwise be a dull collection of facts with the deeper meaning of lived experience. Stories bring us together in celebration of our commonalities even while they honor our differences.

Spotlight Oral History captures and shares the stories of individuals, organizations, and communities through in-depth interviews based on thorough historical research.

Pictured Rocks 3

Facebook Posts

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

From the archives:

Despite pressure from social workers, parents, doctors, and psychologists to release their "illegitimate" babies for adoption, mothers sometimes faced condemnation for doing so, as this August 19, 1965 article from the Minneapolis Star attests.

The article prompted an outpouring of criticism from adoption caseworkers, social workers, court workers, adoptive parents, and at least one woman who had relinquished her son, all of whom lambasted it and the court officials it quoted for their "destructive moralizing." They pointed out the care and anguish with which mothers undertook such a decision and praised the "sacrifice" they made so that their children would have better lives in adoptive homes.

Although this article certainly demanded a rejoinder, the rush to defend relinquishing mothers reinforced the idea of adoption as the "best solution" to illegitimacy.

#BMHoralhistory #Boothgirls
... See MoreSee Less

From the archives:

Despite pressure from social workers, parents, doctors, and psychologists to release their illegitimate babies for adoption, mothers sometimes faced condemnation for doing so, as this August 19, 1965 article from the Minneapolis Star attests.

The article prompted an outpouring of criticism from adoption caseworkers, social workers, court workers, adoptive parents, and at least one woman who had relinquished her son, all of whom lambasted it and the court officials it quoted for their destructive moralizing. They pointed out the care and anguish with which mothers undertook such a decision and praised the sacrifice they made so that their children would have better lives in adoptive homes.

Although this article certainly demanded a rejoinder, the rush to defend relinquishing mothers reinforced the idea of adoption as the best solution to illegitimacy. 

#BMHoralhistory #Boothgirls

Comment on Facebook

It was damned if you do, damned if you don’t. A messed up society.

Damned if do/don't

Ugh!

2 weeks ago

Spotlight Oral History

It's not too late! Don't take your rights for granted or let others decide the shape your community will take. If there are issues or elections to be decided in your area, go vote! It's not just the four-year cycles that matter.Many Minnesotans are headed to the polls today! Click here to see a list of elections:

www.sos.state.mn.us/media/3835/regularly-scheduled-2019-elections.pdf

Is your town, city, or school district on the list? Go vote!

Not sure if you're registered? You can still register at the polling place today:

www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/register-to-vote/register-on-election-day/
... See MoreSee Less

Its not too late! Dont take your rights for granted or let others decide the shape your community will take. If there are issues or elections to be decided in your area, go vote! Its not just the four-year cycles that matter.

From the archives:

I just spent the weekend at the CUB (Concerned United Birthparents) retreat in California, listening to birth mothers of the Baby Scoop Era talk about how much they wished they could've kept their babies who were adopted away. It seems that sentiment was not unique to unmarried mothers of the mid-20th century, as this article from the 1932 Minneapolis Tribune attests. A grief-stricken unmarried pregnant girl who had fled to California from the Midwest "to save her foster parents from disgrace" was arrested for kidnapping her own child from the wealthy woman who had been declared its guardian. That woman, herself a divorcee, had been accused of falsely claiming the child as her own in order to lay claim to a sizeable inheritance. Nevertheless, the toddler was returned to her guardian and its mother thrown in jail.

#BMHoralhistory #BoothGirls #whatmakesamother
... See MoreSee Less

From the archives:

I just spent the weekend at the CUB (Concerned United Birthparents) retreat in California, listening to birth mothers of the Baby Scoop Era talk about how much they wished they couldve kept their babies who were adopted away. It seems that sentiment was not unique to unmarried mothers of the mid-20th century, as this article from the 1932 Minneapolis Tribune attests. A grief-stricken unmarried pregnant girl who had fled to California from the Midwest to save her foster parents from disgrace was arrested for kidnapping her own child from the wealthy woman who had been declared its guardian. That woman, herself a divorcee, had been accused of falsely claiming the child as her own in order to lay claim to a sizeable inheritance. Nevertheless, the toddler was returned to her guardian and its mother thrown in jail.

#BMHoralhistory #BoothGirls #whatmakesamother

Comment on Facebook

Heartbreaking.

That's quite the story.

Tragic.

Wow.

4 weeks ago

Spotlight Oral History

... See MoreSee Less

Load more