We are our stories. Shaping our past experiences into a story helps us make sense of the world and our place in it. Stories communicate our most cherished values and dearly-held beliefs. They bring history to life by animating what might otherwise be a dull collection of facts with the deeper meaning of lived experience. Stories bring us together in celebration of our commonalities even while they honor our differences.

Spotlight Oral History captures and shares the stories of individuals, organizations, and communities through in-depth interviews based on thorough historical research.

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Happy ratification day!

Although Minnesota had become the fifteenth state to ratify the 19th Amendment on September 8, 1919, it wasn't until August 18, 1920, that women's right to vote was finally and fully secured. On that date, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, thus securing the required support of 3/4 of the states.

#WomenGettheVote #WomenandVotingRightsOHP #Suffrageat100 #theworkcontinues
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Happy ratification day!

Although Minnesota had become the fifteenth state to ratify the 19th Amendment on September 8, 1919, it wasnt until August 18, 1920, that womens right to vote was finally and fully secured. On that date, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, thus securing the required support of 3/4 of the states. 

#WomenGettheVote #WomenandVotingRightsOHP #Suffrageat100 #theworkcontinues

By the late 1960s and early 1970s, maternity homes for unwed mothers were falling out of fashion. This ad for Booth Memorial Hospital (ca 1969) ran alongside an article that said that nearly 75% of women who delivered babies at Booth relinquished them for adoption. That practice was on the way out, too. In 1971, the Ramsey County Welfare Dept found that 77% of unmarried mothers in the county (not just those at Booth) KEPT their babies.

I found this ad/article, undated and unlabeled, in a box of materials at Booth Brown House.

#Boothgirls #BMHoralhistory
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By the late 1960s and early 1970s, maternity homes for unwed mothers were falling out of fashion. This ad for Booth Memorial Hospital (ca 1969) ran alongside an article that said that nearly 75% of women who delivered babies at Booth relinquished them for adoption. That practice was on the way out, too. In 1971, the Ramsey County Welfare Dept found that 77% of unmarried mothers in the county (not just those at Booth) KEPT their babies. 

I found this ad/article, undated and unlabeled, in a box of materials at Booth Brown House.

#Boothgirls #BMHoralhistory

2 weeks ago

Spotlight Oral History

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From the archives:

Check out this ad from the February 15, 1930, issue of the Minneapolis Star.

On the surface, it appears to be a promotion for a simple feminine hygiene product. But in an era when birth control (and ads for it) was illegal, many feminine hygiene products were used as contraceptives. Douches, in particular, were marketed in the coded language of "feminine hygiene" for their supposed contraceptive uses. Lysol douches were among the most well-known such dual-purpose products, but they were harsh, dangerous, and ineffective. For a time, Lysol douches contained cresol...which this ad take pains to point out Pariogen tablets do not.

I haven't been able to find much information about Pariogen tablets specifically, but it seems likely that this ad was trying to alert women "who do not know" that there was a safer, more effective way of "protecting" themselves.

#BMHoralhistory #Boothgirls
... See MoreSee Less

From the archives:

Check out this ad from the February 15, 1930, issue of the Minneapolis Star. 

On the surface, it appears to be a promotion for a simple feminine hygiene product. But in an era when birth control (and ads for it) was illegal, many feminine hygiene products were used as contraceptives. Douches, in particular, were marketed in the coded language of feminine hygiene for their supposed contraceptive uses. Lysol douches were among the most well-known such dual-purpose products, but they were harsh, dangerous, and ineffective. For a time, Lysol douches contained cresol...which this ad take pains to point out Pariogen tablets do not.

I havent been able to find much information about Pariogen tablets specifically, but it seems likely that this ad was trying to alert women who do not know that there was a safer, more effective way of protecting themselves.

#BMHoralhistory #Boothgirls

Spent yesterday going through the informal archives at Booth Brown House, formerly Booth Memorial Hospital, and came across this fabulous unlabeled, undated photo.
#BMHoralhistory #Boothgirls
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Spent yesterday going through the informal archives at Booth Brown House, formerly Booth Memorial Hospital, and came across this fabulous unlabeled, undated photo. 
#BMHoralhistory  #Boothgirls

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Oh, sweet babes.

I spent a lot of time at Regions Hospital in St. Paul recently with a sick relative and I often wondered if they had an archives which would have included Booth. Where is it located? I'm specifically interested in the St Paul Salvation Army Home for Fallen women which was part of Booth for a while. I'd love to pay a visit the next time I'm in the Cities.

Wow! Makes me smile and be sad at the same time, thinking of the young women who had little choice in whether they could even think of keeping their babies....

Wow, big babies. Not newborns. I would have thought they were adopted very soon after birth.

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